Homemade Dinner Rolls – Gluten-Free

homemade gluten free dinner rollsThese homemade dinner rolls are just like moms except they are gluten free.

Soft, Light and Delicious.

You can easily adapt the recipe  by using a combination of your favorite types of flour such as rice flour, buckwheat, oat, millet, quinoa or for a nutty flavor almond or hazelnut.

Now it took me a few tries to master this recipe, after all it is hard to beat good ol’ mom’s bread.  But at last, this recipe is darn near perfect.

Serve them anyway your heart desires; with dinner, lunch, breakfast or for an afternoon snack with butter, jam or honey. Enjoy!

 

Gluten-Free Diet

For many, a gluten-free diet is a necessity for maintaining their health. For instance, some people suffer from gluten-type ailments like Celiac Disease and autoimmune digestive ailment. Others just want to eliminate gluten from their diet in order to lose a few extra pounds. And because of the sudden craze and need for gluten-free products, companies are offering gluten free products. According to Prevention Magazine, even Domino’s Pizza has a gluten-free pizza crust.

However,  these new gluten free products are not always palatable. In fact, many are not.  As well, for true sufferers of Celiac Disease, it is generally safest to stay away from most “said” gluten free foods. This can be a difficult challenge to stay on a diet because it eliminates many foods. But you can have more control and options by making your own breads and gluten-free flour.

Sufferers of Celiac Disease, an autoimmune digestive ailment, must avoid foods containing gluten—but somehow, the diet has caught on with non-sufferers who think cutting out gluten will help them eat better or lose weight. It won’t necessarily do either, yet loads of gluten-free products marketed to the general population suggest that it can. Even Domino’s Pizza is on the bandwagon with gluten-free pizza crust, although the company’s website cautions that it is not recommended for true Celiac suffers!

Homemade Dinner Rolls | Gluten-Free
Serves 12
Soft, Light & Delicious
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Prep Time
2 hr
Cook Time
25 min
Total Time
2 hr 25 min
Prep Time
2 hr
Cook Time
25 min
Total Time
2 hr 25 min
Ingredients
  1. * 1 package active dry yeast
  2. * 1 cup warm water
  3. * 1 ½ teaspoon rock or Himalayan salt
  4. * 3 ½ -4 cups gluten-free flour, see note and recipe below
  5. * 2 TBLS honey or agave nectar
  6. * 3 TBLS unsalted butter (softened) or olive oil
  7. * ¼ cup cornmeal, optional (for flouring the baking sheet)
  8. * 1 egg white, lightly beaten (optional)
  9. * Poppy or sesame seeds (optional)
Instructions
  1. In a medium bowl, add warm water, honey and yeast. Stir to dissolve yeast. Set aside for at least 5 minutes
  2. In a large bowl, combine flour and salt. Mix in oil or butter with a fork or your hands
  3. Add the yeast water mixture to the flour mixture. Add more flour if needed to make a firm but soft dough
  4. Cover dough with a towel and allow the dough to rest 10 minutes
  5. On a lightly floured surface, knead dough then form into a ball.
  6. Cover dough with a towel and proof in a warm place until double in bulk, about 1 to 1 ½ hours
  7. Punch down and then shape into balls. You can either shape individual balls or make cloverleaf dinner rolls by placing 3 balls into each lightly oiled muffin cup
  8. Lightly brush dinner rolls with oil to prevent the dough from drying out. Cover and allow to rise once more until double in bulk
  9. If poppy or sesame seeds are desired; brush dinner rolls with beaten egg white then sprinkle with seeds
  10. Preheat oven to 350°F (175°C)
  11. Bake gluten-free dinner rolls for 15-25 minutes or until golden brown. You can tell if they are done if the rolls sound hollow when you tap them
  12. Serve warm with butter, honey or both. Enjoy!
Notes
  1. Diet Type: Vegetarian
  2. Diet Tags: Gluten Free
Guide for Flour Density
  1. 1. Lightweight gluten free flours, or the least dense, are your starchiest flours and are usually neutral in taste. Potato starch, sweet rice flour, tapioca flour and white rice flour the lightest flours. Note: Potato starch is only used to enhance the quality of gluten free baked goods.
  2. 2. Medium weight gluten free flours are generally more nutritious than lightweight flours. They have more body and bulk such as amaranth, superfine brown rice, coconut, millet, quinoa, garbanzo bean, sorghum and teff.
  3. 3. Heavy weight flours are much denser but also more nutritious. Nut flours are clearly higher in fat but have omega-3 fatty acids and other healthy nutrients. Almond flour, regular brown rice, buckwheat, stone ground cornmeal and nut meals like walnut or pecan are considered heavy weight flours.
Living Green newsflash http://living-green-newsflash.com/

Flour Recipe

This is an easy gluten free flour blend to use in place of all-purpose flour in most recipes such as dinner rolls, pastries, muffins, cakes, quick breads, etc.

Ingredients

1 cup white or Brown Rice Flour
1 cup Almond Meal Flour
1 cup Coconut Flour(or Sweet White Rice Flour)
1 cup Tapioca Flour
¼ cup Potato Starch
3½ teaspoon Xanthan Gum or Psyllium Husk (optional)

Instructions

Combine all ingredients in a large bowl. Place flour mixture in an air-tight container until ready to use. Store in cool, dry place.

 

gluten free dinner rolls

 

Find the Right Ingredients On Amazon

Nature Nate’s 100% Pure, Raw and Unfiltered Honey, 32 Ounce

Bob’s Red Mill White Sesame Seeds, 16-ounce (Pack of 4) (Package May Vary)

Bob’s Red Mill Super-Fine Almond Flour, 16-Ounce Packages (Pack of 4)

Make Baking Easy

 

Picture credit

Featured picture: land_camera_land_camera via photopin cc
Dinner rolls on rack: jensteele via photopin cc
Dinner rolls with sesame seeds: Good stuff via photopin (license)
Dinner roll in bowl: Mmm… fresh hot dinner rolls via photopin (license)

 
 

Mary

As a healer and culinary entrepreneur, we are proud to offer generations of scrumptious & healthy recipes.

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6 Responses

  1. Heidi says:

    Tried making these, but they came out like rocks. I followed the steps to a T. Do you mind sharing the flour combination you use to get them nice and fluffy? I did the 2 cups of brown rice flour, then added a cup and a half of premixed bread flour. I thought for sure that would work, but nope.

    • Mary says:

      Hi Heidi

      Strange. It could be a combination of things. I am not sure what you mean by premixed bread flour. Some premixes can have other ingredients that can offset the leavening. Did you sift the flour? Heavier flours such as buckwheat will make a heavier dough. Premixed bread flours are also heavier than pastry flour. For the lightest bread you could use 1 part white rice flour to 4 parts light pastry flour. It’s just not as healthy. White flour does not have near the nutrients as other flours.

      I must thanks you for the heads up. I am now adding the following note to the recipe:

      1. Lightweight gluten free flours, or the least dense, are your starchiest flours and are usually neutral in taste. Potato starch, sweet rice flour, tapioca flour and white rice flour the lightest flours. Note: Potato starch is only used to enhance the quality of gluten free baked goods.
      2. Medium weight gluten free flours are generally more nutritious than lightweight flours. They have more body and bulk such as amaranth, superfine brown rice, coconut, millet, quinoa, garbanzo bean, sorghum and teff.
      3. Heavy weight flours are much denser but also more nutritious. Nut flours are clearly higher in fat but have omega-3 fatty acids and other healthy nutrients. Almond flour, regular brown rice, buckwheat, stone ground cornmeal and nut meals like walnut or pecan are considered heavy weight flours.

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